As Ballyhannon Castle is situated close to the centre of Ireland, by staying there at you are ideally based to explore anywhere in Ireland, and most conveniently the West and South coasts which are known the world over for their beauty of landscapes and warmth of hospitality. From the countless picturesque villages to the bustling cities of Limerick, Cork and Galway, or from the wild countryside from Dingle to Connemara to the mighty Shannon River and unique flora and fauna of the Burren, there is simply nowhere else quite like it.  Ballyhannon Castle is perfectly positioned on the West of Ireland in Co. Clare – the heart of the west coast.

For plenty of examples of activities, places to see and things to do near Ballyhannon Castle, click here

The Property is at the end of a long private avenue (cul-de-sac), just off a minor road which connects to the main Limerick to Galway motorway, also serving Shannon International Airport approximately 10 miles away, and allowing easy access to everywhere on the west coast. It is approximately:

-          3 miles from the local villages of Newmarket-on-Fergus and Quin, with its famous Quin Abbey; also minutes away is Knappogue Castle, providing top-class medieval entertainment where traditional pageantry and banquets are held weekly (and nightly in high season)

Bunratty Castle and Folk Park 10 minutes' drive to Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, a heritage visitors centre consisting of a Medieval village beside its famous 15th century castle. It is an impressive living and working museum that recaptures life in Ireland centuries past. It has urban and rural dwellings, 8 farmhouses, a village street with school, post office, pub and pawn shop. There are daily demonstrations of bread-baking, knitting and weaving. This is where the O’Brien clan lived for 8 generations before moving to their more comfortable Dromoland Estate. Nightly, musicians and singers in period costume-dress entertain their guests during a 4-course banquet. Its finger-licking, cutlery-free and meade-filled guests pay homage to an Earl and Lady randomly selected on the night;
40 minutes to The Burren, with flora and fauna unique to Ireland, underground rivers and caves open to the public. This local landscape has been a source of fascination and enjoyment for visitors, both local and international, for generations. Its name comes from the Irish for ‘rocky place’, and being home to a variety of flora and fauna, is often referred to as Europe’s largest rock garden because of its rare artic, alpine and Mediterranean plants growing side by side in the miles of limestone rock. The Burren is a trail of 20 miles that crosses lands, rock hills, paths and green roads similar to lunar-like landscape, making it popular with hikers, as well as artists and archaeologists interested in its pre-Christian dolmens;
The Burren
The Cliffs of Moher

The Aran Islands are one of the Irish-speaking areas of Ireland and are Europe's most westerly point. Inishmór is the largest island, home to the impressive Iron Age fortress of Dun Aengus, while Inisheer’s atmospheric beauty has attracted countless writers and artists over the years, and has history dating right back to a 4th century monastic settlement.
 
60 minutes to the Cliffs of Moher, ranked as one of Ireland’s most famous and visited sights. They rise over 700 feet high, stretch 5 miles along the coast and display wild and rugged coastline. They are home to thousands of screeching puffins and you can take a coastal walk to see unparalleled views of the Atlantic seascape. The O’Brien tower at the top of the cliffs offers views of the Aran Islands;
 

-          20 minutes south on the motorway to the famous city of Limerick. For those interested in shopping, eating out or nightlife, this historic city is dominated by the awesome 13th century King John's Castle, once the most formidable English fortification in Ireland. Limerick is where the famous Hunt Museum is located, home to one of Ireland's finest collections of Bronze Age, Celtic and Medieval treasures;

-          10 miles from Ennis, County Clare’s largest and cultural town, voted the “Tidiest town in Ireland for 2005”. Ennis is the home of traditional Irish music, plenty of pubs with live Irish music sessions nightly, cobble-stoned streets lined with a great restaurants and shops, and has a market day on Saturday. Founded in Medieval times, the countryside surrounding Ennis is home to a host of abbeys, ruins of castles and ancient monuments, and the beautiful 13th century Ennis Friary;

-          A 60 minute drive north on the motorway to Galway City, the unofficial “capital of the West” and a delightful, prosperous city brimming with history and filled with top class shopping precincts, theatres, pubs and restaurants. Its vibrant cultural life includes a year-round calendar of events such as the Galway Arts Festival, the famous Galway Races at the end of July, the Jazz Festival in February, the Cuirt Festival of Literature at Easter and the Galway International Oyster Festival at the end of September.

-          From Galway, one can pop across to The Aran Islands, which are one of the few remaining Irish-speaking areas of Ireland and are Europe's most westerly point. Inishmór is the largest of these islands, home to the impressive Iron Age fortress of Dun Aengus, while Inisheer’s atmospheric beauty has attracted countless writers and artists over the years, and has history dating right back to a 4th century monastic settlement. It is from these islands that the Aran sweater originated;

-          90 minutes to the wild and rustic countryside of Connemara.

 

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